Blog :: The Monster that is the Aptitude Test

 

The Oxford dictionary defines aptitude as “a natural ability to do something”.  Different people have an aptitude for dancing, writing, painting or even fighting. However, this innocent sounding word transforms into a monster feared by all just by adding the word “test” right in front of it.

If we look at it, a single test administered to thousands seems quite an unfair way to judge an individual’s ‘aptitude’. To be honest, it is. Does the test succeed in defining the true potential of any individual’s ability to perform. Not really. Then why do corporate organizations, under graduate & post graduate institutions, civil service organizations rely on it so much to help find the best candidates for their various vacancies. The reason is quite simple actually. It is easy and reasonably effective if used appropriately.

Let’s role play for a small experiment. You are the head of admissions of one of the most elite institutions in the country. Every year tens of thousands of eager aspirants apply to your institution for a mere 100 seats. To be able to judge an individual’s entire profile of achievements and capabilities, you would need to spend at least 5 minutes on each individual. If there are 20,000 applicants you are looking at a long time just poring over one resume after another. Not the best way spend a day, you would agree.  This is where the aptitude test comes into its own. If you can filter out the bottom 19,000, by a single common test, it would make life a lot easier.

 An aptitude test thus works as a tool for elimination. The stress on that word is because the party conducting the test is not necessarily looking for the toppers of the test. The primary objective is to remove those who don’t meet the minimum criteria to qualify. How easily an individual participant clears the cut-off is usually not a major decision criteria.

This should come as good news for the aspirant. The task suddenly looks a lot less daunting. It is no longer about solving everything in the test, but just to do well enough to clear it.

How to do that in the next post..

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dhrupad(-)

The Oxford dictionary defines aptitude as “a natural ability to do something”.  Different people have an aptitude for dancing, writing, painting or even fighting. However, this innocent sounding word transforms into a monster feared by all just by adding the word “test” right in front of it.

If we look at it, a single test administered to thousands seems quite an unfair way to judge an individual’s ‘aptitude’. To be honest, it is. Does the test succeed in defining the true potential of any individual’s ability to perform. Not really. Then why do corporate organizations, under graduate & post graduate institutions, civil service organizations rely on it so much to help find the best candidates for their various vacancies. The reason is quite simple actually. It is easy and reasonably effective if used appropriately.

Let’s role play for a small experiment. You are the head of admissions of one of the most elite institutions in the country. Every year tens of thousands of eager aspirants apply to your institution for a mere 100 seats. To be able to judge an individual’s entire profile of achievements and capabilities, you would need to spend at least 5 minutes on each individual. If there are 20,000 applicants you are looking at a long time just poring over one resume after another. Not the best way spend a day, you would agree.  This is where the aptitude test comes into its own. If you can filter out the bottom 19,000, by a single common test, it would make life a lot easier.

 An aptitude test thus works as a tool for elimination. The stress on that word is because the party conducting the test is not necessarily looking for the toppers of the test. The primary objective is to remove those who don’t meet the minimum criteria to qualify. How easily an individual participant clears the cut-off is usually not a major decision criteria.

This should come as good news for the aspirant. The task suddenly looks a lot less daunting. It is no longer about solving everything in the test, but just to do well enough to clear it.

How to do that in the next post..

Friday 26th of August 2011 09:08:53 AM
rohit prajapati(pune-india)

hi all

Friday 26th of August 2011 10:08:16 AM
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